Parrot Facts


Parrots are colorful birds with curved bills for eating fruits and seeds and for cracking nuts. They are very noisy birds and they live mostly in tropical rainforests. Parrots have feet with two toes pointing forwards and two backwards, allowing them to grip branches and hold food. There are 330 or so parrot species divided…
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Hypoplastic Bones


This is a very serious life-endangering form of anemia due to a reduced activity of the bone marrow and its failure to produce normal red cells and platelets. This causes a reduction in the number of cells in the blood, particularly the important granulocytes (those that destroy germs, the phagocytes). There are many causes. Sad…
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Syringomyelia


This is an uncommon disease of the nervous system occurring in either sex, with symptoms manifesting themselves during the period of most rapid growth. It is rare after the age of thirty. Cavities occur in the spinal cord and produce symptoms. It is believed to be due to an inherited defect in brain development. Syringomyelia…
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Bronchiectasis Respiratory Disorder


What is Bronchiectasis Respiratory Disorder? Bronchiectasis is a lung disorder in which the bronchi are dilated abnormally. It often develops in childhood, resulting from obstruction and infection occurring in the air passageways. Obstruction may result from many causes, such as plugs of mucus chronically blocking airways. Childhood pneumonia commonly accompanies such mundane events as measles…
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Tsunami Facts


Tsunamis are huge waves that begin when the sea floor is violently shaken by an earthquake, a landslide or a volcanic eruption. In deep water tsunamis travel almost unnoticeably below the surface. However, once they reach shallow coastal waters they rear up into waves 30 m high or higher. Tsunamis are often mistakenly called ‘tidal…
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Glue Ear


Glue ear occurs in children and seems to be increasing in frequency. It may follow on Endolymph fluid Vestibular nerve Hairs Gelatinous mass (capula) Eustachian tube from an incompletely cured otitis media infection when insufficient antibiotics are given or taken for an inadequate period of time to completely cure the infection. Thin, serous (watery) fluid…
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Bible Story of Rebecca and Isaac


Genesis 24:1-6I Many years later Abraham told his servant, “Go back to my home land and find a wife for Isaac.” This was a nearly impossible mission. There were so many women. The servant prayed to Abraham’s God all during the journey. Finally, he arrived by a well in the land where Abraham once had…
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Chromosome Facts


Chromosomes are the microscopically tiny, twisted threads inside every cell that carry your body’s life instructions in chemical form. There are 46 chromosomes in each of your body cells, divided into 23 pairs. One of each chromosome pair came from your mother and the other from your father. In a girl’s 23 chromosome pairs, each…
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Ozone Layer Facts


Life on Earth depends on the layer of ozone gas in the air (see atmosphere), which shields the Earth from the Sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays. Ozone molecules are made from three atoms of oxygen, not two like oxygen. In 1982 scientists in Antarctica noticed a 50 percent loss of ozone over the Antarctic every spring….
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Skin Facts


Skin is your protective coat, shielding your body from the weather and from infection, and helping to keep it at just the right temperature. Skin is your largest sense receptor, responding to touch, pressure, heat and cold. Even though its thickness averages just 2 mm, your skin gets an eighth of all your blood supply….
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Rat Facts


Mice and rats belong to a group of 1,800 species of small mammals called rodents. The group also includes squirrels, voles, lemmings beavers, porcupines and guinea pigs. All rodents have two pairs of razor-sharp front teeth for gnawing nuts and berries, and a set of ridged teeth in their cheeks for chewing. A rodent’s front…
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Weather Facts


Hurricanes are powerful, whirling tropical storms. They are also called willywillies, cyclones or typhoons. Hurricanes develop in late summer as clusters of thunderstorms build up over warm seas (at least 27°C). As hurricanes grow, they tighten into a spiral with a calm ring of low pressure called the ‘eye’ at the centre. Hurricanes move westwards…
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Sunday School Lesson on Disadvantages of Disobedience Activity


A. The Passing of Generations In 2004 the Allies marked the sixtieth anniversary of the Normandy D-Day invasion. It was a reunion of the primary World War II partners:U.S. Canada, Russia, Britain, and France. The Germans were also invited for the first time, be-cause there was some recognition that the Ger-man people suffered terribly in…
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Shark Facts


Sharks are the most fearsome predatory fish of the seas. There are 375 species, living mostly in warm seas. Sharks have a skeleton made of rubbery cartilage – most other kinds of fish have bony skeletons. The world’s biggest fish is the whale shark, which can grow to well over 12 m long. Unlike other…
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Halley’s Comet Facts


Halley’s comet is named after the British scientist Edmund Halley (1656-1742). Halley predicted that this particular comet would return in 1758, 16 years after his death. It was the first time a comet’s arrival had been predicted. Halley’s comet orbits the Sun every 76 years. Its orbit loops between Mercury and Venus, and stretches out…
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Facts on Pierre and Marie Curie


Pierre and Marie Curie were the husband and wife scientists who discovered the nature of radioactivity. In 1903 they won a Nobel Prize for their work. Marie Curie (1867-1934) was born Marya Sklodowska in Poland. She went to Paris in 1891 to study physics. Pierre Curie (1859-1906) was a French lecturer in physics who discovered…
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Snake Bites


Pit vipers – rattlesnakes, cottonmouths, and copperheads – inject venom through two hollow needlelike fangs. Coral snakes are also poisonous, but they are much less common than pit vipers. Unlike pit vipers, coral snakes do not have hollow fangs, but rather short (less than t/8 inch) rigid grooved pegs. Therefore, they must gnaw on their…
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