Copper Facts



  • The high conductivity of copper makes it a perfect material for the core of electrical cables.
  • Copper was one of the first metals used by humans over 10,000 years ago.
  • Copper is one of the few metals that occur naturally in a pure form.
  • Most of the copper that we use today comes from ores such as cuprite and chalcopyrite.
  • The world’s biggest deposits of pure copper are in volcanic lavas in the Andes Mountains in Chile.
  • Copper has the atomic number 29, an atomic mass of 63.546 and melts at 1083°C.
  • Copper is by far the best low-cost conductor of electricity, so it is widely used for electrical cables.
  • Copper is also a good conductor of heat, which is why it is used to make the bases of saucepans and heating pipes.
  • Copper is so ductile (easily stretched) that a copper rod as thick as a finger can be stretched out thinner than a human hair.
  • After being in the air for some time, copper gets a thin green coating of copper carbonate called verdigris. ‘Verdigris’ means green of Greece.