Deciduous Tree Facts



  • Deciduous trees lose their leaves once a year.
  • In cool places, deciduous trees lose their leaves in autumn to cut their need for water in winter when water may be frozen.
  • In the tropics deciduous trees lose their leaves at the start of the dry season.
  • Leaves fall because a layer of cork grows across the leaf stalk, gradually cutting off its water supply.
  • Eventually the leaf is only hanging on by its veins, and is easily blown off by the wind.
  • Leaves go brown and other colors in autumn because their green chlorophyll breaks down, letting other pigments shine through instead.
  • Among the most spectacular autumn colors are those of the sweet gum tree, which was brought to Europe from Mexico c.1570.
  • The main deciduous trees found in cool climates are oaks, beeches, birches, chestnuts, aspens, elms, maples and lindens.
  • Most deciduous trees are broad-leaved, but five conifer groups including larches are deciduous.
  • Some tropical evergreen trees are deciduous in regions where there is a marked dry season.