Frog Facts



  • Frogs and toads are amphibians – creatures that live both on land and in the water.
  • There are about 3,500 species of frog and toad. Most live near water, but some live in trees and others live underground.
  • Frogs are mostly smaller and better jumpers. Toads are bigger, with thicker, wartier skin which holds on to moisture and allows them to live on land longer.
  • Frogs and toads are meat-eaters. They catch fast moving insects by darting out their long, sticky tongues.
  • Frogs and toads begin life as fish-like tadpoles, hatching in the water from huge clutches of eggs called spawn.
  • After 7 to 10 weeks, tadpoles grow legs and lungs and develop frogs ready to leave the water.
  • In midwife toads, the male looks after the eggs, not the female – winding strings of eggs around his back legs and carrying them about until they hatch.
  • The male Darwin’s frog swallows the eggs and keeps them in his throat until they hatch – and pop out of his mouth.
  • The goliath frog of West Africa is the largest frog – at over 25 cm long. The biggest toad is the cane toad of Queensland, Australia – one weighed 2.6 kg and measured 50 cm in length with its legs outstretched. The cane toad was introduced to Australia from South America to help control pests.
  • The arrow-poison frogs that live in the tropical rainforests of Central America get their name because natives tip their arrows with deadly poison from glands in the frogs’ skin. Many arrow-poison frogs are very colorful.
  • The natterjack toad is easily recognized by a distinctive yellow line down its head and back. It gives off a smell of burning rubber when alarmed.