Horse Facts



  • Horses are big, four-legged, hooved animals, now bred mainly for human use.
  • Male horses are called stallions, females are mares, babies are foals, and young males are colts.
  • The only wild horse is the Przewalski of central Asia.
  • The mustangs (wild horses) of the USA are descended from tame horses.
  • Tame horses are of three main kinds — light horses for riding (such as Morgans and Arabs), heavy horses for pulling ploughs and wagons (such as Percherons and Suffolk Punches), and ponies (such as Shetlands). 0. All horses, wild and tame, may be descended from the prehistoric Merychippus (see evolution).
  • A domestic horse. The rare Przewalski’s horse of the Mongolian steppes is probably similar to the ancestor of today’s many domestic horse breeds. Horses are built for grazing on grasses and for galloping at high speed for long distances,
  • Most racehorses and hunting horses are thoroughbred (pure) Arab horses descended from just three stallions that lived around 1700 — Darley Arabian, Godolphin Barb and Byerly Turk.
  • Lippizaners are beautiful white horses, the best-known of which are trained to jump and dance at the Spanish Riding School in Vienna.
  • The shire horse is probably the largest horse, bred after King Henry VIII had all horses under 1.5 m destroyed.
  • You can tell a horse’s age by counting its teeth — a 1-year-old has six pairs, a 5-year-old has twelve.
  • Quarter horses are agile horses used by cowhands for cutting out (soiling cows from the herd). They got their name from running quarter-mile races.