Mice Facts



  • In the early 1940s, a huge population of house mice in California had a density Burrowing house mouse Yellow necked mouse of about 200,000 per hectare.
  • The Andes fishing mouse — only discovered in 1994 — fishes in streams at an altitude of at least 3,600 m.
  • The Australian pebble mound mouse builds large piles of rounded stones, and then takes up residence in them.
  • The Oldfield mouse has an escape tunnel leading from its nest near to the surface, so it can escape intruders by breaking through the apparent ‘dead end’.
  • The water mice of Central America have webbed, hairy feet that help them dive for water snails and fish.
  • American grasshopper mice defend their territory by standing on their hind legs, shrieking at rival mice.
  • Grasshopper mice are sometimes kept as pets to clear a house of insect pests such as cockroaches.
  • An ancient Greek legend tells how a Cretan army owed its success to divine mice, which gnawed through the shield straps of the enemy.
  • The Old World harvest mouse climbs through tall grasses using its grasping tail and flexible feet.
  • American kangaroo mice have long, hairy hind feet and a long tail, and often travel in a series of leaps. Woodmouse Climbing harvest mouse
  • Though mice have small appetites they ruin vast amounts of food especially stores of grain.