Pollination Facts



  • For seeds to develop, pollen from a flower’s male anther must get to a female stigma.
  • Some flowers are self pollinating and the pollen moves from an anther to a stigma on the same plant.
  • In cross-pollinating flowers, the pollen from the anthers must be carried to a stigma on a different plant of the same kind.
  • Some pollen is carried by the wind.
  • Most pollen is carried on the bodies of insects such as bees or by birds or bats that visit the flower.
  • Butterflies, such as this Monarch, feed mainly on nectar and other plant juices, helping plant pollination in the process.
  • Many flowers rely on attracting bees to carry their pollen.
  • Insect-pollinated flowers are often brightly colored and sweet smelling to attract bees and butterflies.
  • Bees and butterflies are also drawn by the flower’s sweet juice or nectar. As they sip the nectar, they may brush pollen on to the stigma, or take some on their bodies from the anthers to the stigma of other flowers.
  • Bees and butterflies are drawn to draw night-flying moths.
  • Many flowers have honey guides often invisible to us and can only some other insects can see – markings to guide the bees in. These are be seen in ultraviolet light, which bees and
  • The cuckoopint smells like cow-dung to attract the flies that carry its pollen.