Red Shift Facts



  • When distant galaxies are moving away from us, the very, very, fast light waves they give off are stretched out behind them — since each bit of the light wave is being sent from a little bit further away.
  • When the light waves from distant galaxies are stretched out in this way, they look redder. This is called red shift.
  • Red shift was first described by Czech mathematician Christian Doppler in 1842.
  • Edwin Hubble showed that a galaxy’s red shift is proportional to its distance. So the further away a galaxy is, the greater its red shift — and the faster it must be zooming away from us. This is Hubble’s Law.
  • The increase of red shift with distance proved that the Universe is growing bigger.
  • Only nearby galaxies show no red shift at all.
  • The record red shift is 4.25, from the quasar 8C 1435 + 63. It is 96% of the speed of light.
  • Red shift can be caused by the expansion of the Universe, gravity or the effect of relativity (see Einstein).
  • Black holes may create large red shifts.
  • Red Shift occurs as distant galaxies red shifts so big that they must be moving move away from us. The further away a away from us at speeds approaching the speed of light!