Sparrow Facts



  • More than 70% of all bird species – over 5,000 species altogether – are perching birds, or Passerines. They have feet with three toes pointing forwards and one backwards, to help them cling to a perch.
  • Perching birds build neat, small, cup-shaped nests.
  • Perching birds sing – this means that their call is not a single sound, but a sequence of musical notes.
  • Songbirds, such as thrushes, warblers and nightingales, are perching birds with especially attractive songs.
  • Usually only male songbirds sing – and mainly in the mating season, to warn off rivals and attract females.
  • Sparrows are small perching birds found in many parts of the world. Sparrows are seed-eaters with the house sparrow specializing in grain. Changes in farming practices are thought to account for this bird’s dramatic decline in numbers in Britain.
  • Starlings often gather on overhead cables ready to migrate.
  • Sparrows are small, plump birds, whose chirruping song is familiar almost everywhere.
  • Starlings are very common perching birds which often gather in huge flocks, either to feed or to roost.
  • All the millions of European starlings in North America are descended from 100 set free in New York’s Central Park in the 1890s.
  • Many perching birds, including mynahs, are talented mimics. The lyre bird of southeastern Australia can imitate car sirens and chainsaws, as well as other birds.
  • The red-billed quelea of Africa is the world’s most abundant bird. There are over 1.5 billion of them.