Stork Facts



  • In tropical regions, storks’ nests that are perched high on buildings can get very warm, so parent birds cool their young by regurgitating a shower of water over them.
  • The huge beak of the whale-billed stork, or shoebill, is 23 cm long and 10 cm wide. It uses it to catch lungfish, young crocodiles and turtles.
  • Like other wading birds, storks have long, spindly legs, plump bodies and long bills for catching fish.
  • The white stork has long been a symbol of fertility in Europe. Parents used to tell their children that new babies were brought by a stork.
  • The 17 species of stork live in North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia.
  • Marabou storks often scavenge on rubbish tips.
  • The open bill stork’s beak meets only at the tip. This enables it to hold its favorite food — large snails.
  • The tail feathers of marabou storks were once used to trim hats and dresses.
  • When the wood stork’s partly open beak touches a fish under water, it snaps shut in 25 milliseconds — this is
  • The saddle bill stork of southern Africa is easily recognized one of the fastest by its large red, yellow and black bill, reactions of any animal.
  • Male and female white storks take turns to incubate their clutch of 3-5 eggs. When the partners change shifts, they perform a special bill-clattering display.
  • The adjutant stork is named after the adjutant army officer, because of its stiff, military-style walk.