Tulip Facts



  • Tulips are flowers that bloom in spring from bulbs.
  • Tulips are monocots and produce one large, bell-shaped bloom at the end of each stem.
  • There are about 100 species of wild tulip, growing right across Asia to China.
  • Tulips come in most colors but blue. Reds and yellows are common, but they vary from white to deep purple.
  • There are over 4000 garden varieties.
  • Most tulips are ‘late bloomers’ with names like breeders, cottages and parrots.
  • Mid-season bloomers include tulips such as Mendels and Darwins.
  • The word tulip comes from the Turkish for ‘turban’, because of their shape.
  • Food is stored in the tulip bulb so that, as winter approaches, the bulb remains alive underground while the rest of the plant dies.
  • Tulips were introduced to Europe in 1551 by the Viennese ambassador to Turkey, Augier de Busbecq. But Holland became the center of tulip-growing early in the 1600s, when Europe was gripped by tulip mania. At this time, people would exchange mansions for a single tulip bulb. Holland is still the center of tulip-growing.
  • Huge numbers of tulips are now grown in the fields in Holland. Tulip cultivation is still an important industry there, with Dutch growers producing nearly 2000 varieties.