Taste Facts

  • The sense of taste is the crudest of our five senses, giving us less information about the world than any other sense.
  • Taste is triggered by certain chemicals in food, which dissolve in the saliva in the mouth, and then send information to a particular part of the brain via sensory nerve cells on the tongue.
  • Taste buds are receptor cells found around tiny bumps called papillae on the surface of your tongue.
  • Taste buds are sensitive to four basic flavors: sweet, sour, bitter and salty.
  • The back of the tongue contains big round papaillae shaped like an upside-down V. This is where bitter flavors are sensed.
  • The front of the tongue is where Bitter fungi form (mushroom-like) papillae and filiform (hair like) papillae carry taste buds that detect sweet, sour and Salty Sweet salty flavors.
  • As well as taste, the tongue can also feel the texture and temperature of food.
  • Your sense of taste works closely together with your sense of smell to make the flavor of food more interesting.
  • Strong tastes, such as spicy food, rely less on the sense of smell than on pain sensitive nerve endings in the tongue.
  • People can learn to distinguish more flavors and tastes than normal, as is the case with tea or wine-tasters.